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Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Information About Afro-Ecuadorians And Five YouTube Videos Of Afro-Ecuadorians Culture

Edited by Azizi Powell

This post provides information about Afro-Ecuadorians and showcases five YouTube videos of Afro-Ecuadorian culture. Selected comments from some of these video's discussion threads are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for socio-cultural, educational, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in the YouTube examples that are embedded in this post and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT AFRO-ECUADORIANS
From https://soundsandcolours.com/articles/ecuador/esmeraldas-and-its-afro-ecuadorian-cultural-legacy-28309/ ESMERALDAS AND ITS AFRO-ECUADORIAN CULTURAL LEGACY
By Ellen Gordon | 19 June, 2015
"The far-north coast of Ecuador has a historical and cultural background that sets it apart from most of the rest of the country, with cultural traditions whose roots stretch across the globe. In recent years, the Afro-Ecuadorian community who make up most of Esmeraldas have made significant progress in gaining their rights with a constitutional referendum in 1998 which accepted for the first time the status of Ecuador as a racially and culturally hybrid country. Nevertheless, racist attitudes persist and are not always, but very often ingrained in Ecuadorian social norms, especially away from the coastal areas. Esmeraldas, with a 70% Afro-Ecuadorian population, is the most Afro-Ecuadorian concentrated region, followed by the Valle del Chota and both Quito and Guayaquil. These groups have been historically discriminated against by other ethnic groups in all areas except sport, with Afro-Ecuadorians making up a large proportion of the national football team.

Esmeraldas takes its name from Spanish colonisers, who hoped to find a rich source of emeralds, but also for the lush tropical vegetation of the area. A mixture of historical archives and legends tell the tale of a slave ship wrecked along the Northern Pacific coast of Ecuador in 1533 which led to the establishment of an African diaspora settlement merged with indigenous groups from the Esmeraldas area. Runaway slaves from Brazil and surrounding settlements and plantations joined communities known as palenques, and together these groups held off the Spanish colonial powers for many years. The intense mixing and merging of cultures from different sides of the globe is evident in the music of the region today, as in many areas of the Americas where very culturally and ethnically different groups were pushed together under the violent and displacing pressure of the slave trade. Nevertheless African-descended cultural aspects are visible in the popular marimba and arrullos, along with Afro-Brazilian samba influences. This shows the active role played by Africans and their descendants in the cultural make-up of these areas even within the repressive slave trade.

The base of the music is made up of rhytmic drumming and the warm and distinctive marimba, a wooden xylophone, accompanied by singers and a traditional dance. In Esmeraldas and the Pacific Coast of Colombia a branch of the genre, marimba salsera, has more contemporary influences of the salsa culture popular in most parts of Ecuador and throughout Latin America. The esmeraldeños celebrate this cultural and musical legacy in various festivals and performances such as the Festival Internacional de Danza y Musica Afro, and music accompanies and is part of different religious practises. The increasing recognition given to the cultural and historical richness of the area may go some way to confronting the established racist attitudes, but due to the region’s relative economic, infrastructural and social isolation, significant change and equality for Afro-Ecuadorians is yet to materialise.


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From http://www.orijinculture.com/community/marimba-dance-freedom-ultimate-expression-historyculture-discrimination-ecuador-afrodescendants-latin-america-part-3/ "MARIMBA: EXPRESSION OF FREEDOM, YET MY AFRO-ECUADORIANS
Despite the advent of colonialism and having to endure constant discrimination by the dominant mestizo and criollo populations, Afro Ecuadorians have managed to maintain a distinct identity, deeply embedded with their African culture and traditions for nearly four and a half centuries. Unlike the Garifuna who strongly associates with and maintains a rather equal identification with both their African and Carib/indigenous ancestry, Afro Ecuadorians are descendants of Black slaves who overpowered and intermarried with the local indigenous population. However, due to deeply-rooted racism, they have been unable to integrate with the larger Ecuadorian society and as a result, have chosen to create and maintain a strong association with their Black/African ancestry.

The history of Afro Ecuadorians has been one of defined by resilience. The slave boat carrying their forefathers shipwrecked off the coast of the Esmeraldas in 1553 and they were able to create a distinct identity for themselves by preserving aspects of their African roots and culture by successfully fending off the constant onslaught of Spanish colonizers. They were also able to create what is known as the “Zambo Republic”, which became the preferred destination for escaped slaves throughout the region.

Today, Afro Ecuadorians predominantly occupying the coastal Esmeraldas and Valle del Chota regions and they have used music, in the form of the marimba dance, to create a distinct identity within the larger Ecuadorian society and to preserve their African roots and culture. The marimba is a musical instrument, which consists of wooden bars and metal mallets. It closely resembles the xylophone and was derived from the West African balafon. Music among Afro Ecuadorians corresponds with the currulao, or marimba dance. This too has strong roots in the Bantu and Mande heritages in West Africa.

For many Afro Ecuadorians, marimba dances served as the ultimate expression of freedom. To some extent they operated as an autonomous state since they were able to fend off the Spanish colonizers. However, due to the encroachment of the dominant mestizo on the Esmeraldas due to the regions bountiful mineral wealth, restriction were placed on Afro Ecuadorians and for a large portion of the 20th century, marimba dances were regulated and were prohibited unless one possessed a permit. While this greatly affected the prevalence of marimba music and by default Afro Ecuadorian’s African roots and culture, in the early to mid 20th century, Afro-Ecuadorians would once again display their resilient spirit by resurrecting their beloved musical dances and traditions.

In the 1970s, the elder Afro Ecuadorians embarked on a mission to revive their African heritage and tradition by creating folklore schools and dance troops to teach and perform marimba music and dance. This not only helped to foster strong relationships between the younger and older generations but it also enable the younger generations to develop a strong understanding of their roots and culture. Today, marimba music and dance is used in combination with theatre to tell the story of the strong resilient history Afro Ecuadorians possess and also to help foster a sense of pride. Afro Ecuadorians have also used marimba as a means of communication with the African Diaspora. Their performances incorporate themes relatable to all Africans throughout the Diaspora, such as slavery, resistance and resilience. Marimba groups have also been able to partake in major national and international music festivals, where they have been able to display their rich cultural traditions to the rest of the world.

Marimba has become such an important part of Afro Ecuadorian life and life in the Esmeraldas in general, that major cities are plastered with large murals depicting marimba players being accompanied by dancers with the statements “Cultural identity is Part of a Positive Personality” and “Folklore is the Identity of a Cultivated People”. Despite having the ability to proudly represent and display their culture and identity through marimba dance and music, Afro Ecuadorians still struggle to overcome deeply rooted racism and as a result are marginalized by the dominant mestizo and criollo societies. Many live in poverty and are subjected to discrimination, thereby making it difficult for them to integrate with their mestiza and criollo counterparts. Despite these setbacks, Afro Ecuadorians are a strong resilient people. Their resilience continues to be manifested through the growing influence of marimba on the nation and their participation in the Ecuadorian National Football League."...

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SHOWCASE YOUTUBE EXAMPLES

Pancocojams Editor: Most of these videos are narrated in Spanish.

Example #1: Bomba del Valle del Chota Ecuador



miecuador, Published on Oct 5, 2007

Esta es una representacion afro-ecuatoriana del hermoso valle caliente del Chota, que esta ubicado en plena cordillera andina del Ecuador
-sip-
Google Translate:
This is an Afro-Ecuadorian representation of the beautiful hot valley of Chota, which is located in the middle of the Andean mountain range of Ecuador
-snip-
Here's a comment from this video's discussion thread:
Hugo Hidalgo, 2015
"Es gran importancia compartir la música autóctona de nuestro Ecuador, por ello es necesario valorar y defender lo nuestro."
-snip-
Google translate from Spanish to English:
"It is very important to share the indigenous music of our Ecuador, so it is necessary to value and defend what is ours."

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Example #2: Ecuador: Afro-Ecuadorian Culture



ScradnBot, Published on Apr 1, 2013

This is a project I worked on during the 2012 Wabash Immersion Program to Ecuador. The work explores aspects of a culture few people in the United States know about - Afro-Ecuadorian culture. During our trip, we traveled to various Afro-Ecuadorian villages to learn more about the struggles that these people face within the country. I hope that this documentary sheds an optimistic, but meaningful light onto a culture much different from that of the United States.

Only a handheld camera was used for filming. Sound equipment was also limited.

Edited and Produced by: Bradley Wise
Music by: Bradley Wise
Special Thanks: Wabash College, Pontifica Universidad Católica del Ecuador, and the Communities and People who agreed to listen to my incoherent interview questions in Spanish!
-snip-
Here are a few comments from this video's discussion thread:
TheAithWONDER, 2015
1. "Hi, my daughter is seriously considering a study abroad program there. Like any mother and in this day of so much Hate, I want to know how safe is it for a young woman of color to travel and study there?"

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REPLY
2. Black Lit. Black Hist., 2016
"+TheAithWONDER - I am black and I went to Quito while studying abroad. I met the nicest black people every and while I was there, there was a peaceful festival in the heart of Quito of black folks celebrating their black heritage. It was fantastic. I am planning on going back to Ecuador this year and traveling to Esmeraldas."

**
3. keep lefft, 2017
"blacks in the americas need to unite"

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Example #4: Afroecuatorianos Historia



Oscar Moya. Published on Apr 8, 2014
-snip-
Here's a comment exchange from this video's discussion thread:
Andres, 2017
"como estas hermano ecuatoriano Oscar, estoy un poco confundido , al inicio se manifiesta que la etnia negra llego a la zona de Esmeraldas por accidente ya que naufragaron barcos provenientes de panamá con destino Peru , pero después cerca del minuto 06:49 se indica que llegaron como cargamento de esclavos provenientes de Colombia , ayúdame con esa duda por favor ,.."
-snip-
Google translate from Spanish to English
"As you are Ecuadorian brother Oscar, I am a little confused, at the beginning it is manifested that the black ethnic group arrived in the area of Esmeraldas by accident as ships from Panama shipwrecked to Peru, but after about 06:49 it was indicated that they arrived As a shipment of slaves from Colombia, help me with that doubt please,"

**
REPLY
Black Prince, 2017
"Andres pues algunos llegaron antes y otros se escaparon. Los negros esmeraldeños jamas fueron esclavizados."
-snip-
"Andres, some arrived before and others escaped. The Emerald Negroes were never enslaved."

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Example #5: AFROECUATORIANOS



Facil y Sencillo, Published on Mar 17, 2017

NACIONALIDADES Y PUEBLOS EN SUCUMBÍOS
Pueblo Afroecuatoriano.
Se denomina pueblo afroecuatoriano a los descendientes del África que llegaron a América.
Etimológicamente el nombre de Afroecuatorianos proviene, de Afros=descendientes de África y ecuatorianos= nacidos en Ecuador.
Su presencia data, aproximadamente hace más de 500 años, aun cuando no existía la República del Ecuador como tal, y era conocida como la Real Audiencia de Quito, desde entonces han aportado con su cultura, arte y costumbres heredadas por sus ancestros africanos, tomando matices y adopciones de culturas americanas nativas, de esta manera ayudan a enriquecer la diversidad cultural del Ecuador, que lo caracterizan como país pluricultural.
El Pueblo Afro ecuatoriano, se encuentra ubicado en todas las provincias del país. Originalmente se asentó en Esmeraldas, Imbabura, Carchi y Loja; posteriormente, en los años sesenta, producto de la inmigración, su población habita en las provincias del Guayas, Pichincha, El Oro, Los Ríos, Manabí y el Oriente Ecuatoriano, en nuestra provincia tienen la importancia y relevancia dentro de nuestras actividades cotidianas.
Producción:
Cristian Proaño
www.sucumbios.gob.ec
#GPSucumbios #GuidoVargas #MariaJaramilloMadrid
-snip-
Google translate from Spanish to English
"NATIONALITIES AND PEOPLES IN SUCUMBIOS
Afro-Ecuadorian people.
The descendants of Africa who came to America are called Afro-Ecuadorian people.
Etymologically the name of Afro-Ecuadorians comes from Afros = descendants of Africa and Ecuadorians = born in Ecuador.
Its presence dates back approximately 500 years ago, even though the Republic of Ecuador did not exist as such, and was known as the Royal Audience of Quito, since then they have contributed with their culture, art and customs inherited by their African ancestors, taking Nuances and adoptions of native American cultures, in this way help to enrich the cultural diversity of Ecuador, which characterize it as a pluricultural country.
The Afro Ecuadorian people, is located in all the provinces of the country. Originally settled in Esmeraldas, Imbabura, Carchi and Loja; later, in the sixties, product of immigration, its population lives in the provinces of Guayas, Pichincha, El Oro, Los Rios, Manabí and the Ecuadorian Oriente, in our province they have the importance and relevance in our daily activities.
Production:
Cristian Proaño
www.sucumbios.gob.ec"

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Burkina Faso's Don Sharp 2 Batoro's 2012 POWERFUL Video "L'Afrique Vous Parle" (Africa Is Speaking) with English subtitles

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about Burkinabé rapper Don Sharp 2 Batoro (also given as Don Sharp De Batoro).

This post also showcases Don Sharp's 2012 YouTube video entitled "L'Afrique Vous Parle" (Africa Is Speaking). Thankfully, this video includes English subtitles which I have transcribed below that embedded video.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Don Sharp 2 Batoro for his musical legacy. Thanks also to the producer and publisher of this very powerful video and thanks for including English subtitles.

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INFORMATION ABOUT DON SHARP 2 BATORO
From https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://donsharpdebatoro.unblog.fr/&prev=search [translated from French to English] THE DONSHARP 2 BATORO BLOG
..."The name Don Sharp was given to him by his friends for his poignant flow. His first name was Sharpman because he did not mince his words. His rap was also hardcorp. Sharpaman means the man with sharp flow. This name will evolve to give Don Sharp in 2001, and Donsharp 2 Batoro to stay in the Burkinabè tradition. Donsharp 2 Batoro drops his bags in his country of origin Burkina Faso for reasons of studies after obtaining his baccalaureate. Once in Ouagadougou, the young Gourounsi, a people from the center-east of Burkina, educated in Baoulé culture, people of the center of the Ivory Coast must fight to insert in the Ouagalaise life dominated by the Mossi culture. It is in Burkina Faso that Donsharp Batoro really starts a musical career. While continuing his studies, he continues in the rap movement. He creates a group with the name "Campus Platform Form" CPF. This group participates in many events and competitions organized in the capital of Burkina Faso. In 2003, his group CPF won the prize for the best artistic group of the University of Ouagadougou with the musical genre Rap. The following year, Donsharp 2 Batoro was named best rap artist at the University of Ouagadougou in a competition organized by the National Center for University Works (CENOU) of the University of Ouagadougou. From consecration to consecration, he participates with the CPF in his first compilation in a sounding album. He is the artistic director of the bobolais rap group KRONIK.

Donsharp 2 Batoro, the perseverant
The CPF group is struggling to find a producer and breaks up. Donsharp 2 Batoro does not despair. His dream of making music is stronger than ever. Despite difficulties, he holds up and continues to work solo. In October 2006, he found a job in a Burkinabe company as a commercial agent in a province of Burkina Faso. Meanwhile, he is saving money in hopes of one day making his album. A year later, he returned to Ouagadougou and returned to the studio where he recorded the "PP in B", the relationship to joke in the Binon. The dream has come true. The campus title, where the artist tells the story of life on the university campus, revolves around the various TV and radio channels in Burkina. The dedication of his first opus took place at the University of Ouagadougou in the legendary A 600 amphitheater. Donsharp 2 Batoro is asked for many shows in his country. His fame is growing. The Ministry of Culture of Burkina falls under the spell of this album and decides to finance the realization of the second clip "Marriage".

In 2008, Donsharp 2 Batoro won the third tier contest in Burkina Faso. This is a contest rewarding the best traditionally inspired song. This confirms the talent of this young artist who decided to promote the culture of his land especially the Binon, a traditional gourounsi.”

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SHOWCASE VIDEO: DONSHARP 2 BATORO L'AFRIQUE VOUS PARLE [AFRICA IS SPEAKING]



graphic architect, Published on Jul 1, 2012

Artiste : DONSHARP 2 BATORO
Titre : L'AFRIQUE VOUS PARLE
Réal : GRAPHIC ARCHITECT
Prod : GRAPHIC ARCHITECT
LIEU: OUAGADOUGOU-BF
-snip-
Here's my transcription of the English subtitles from this video*

At the beginning was the Word
The Creative Word of God
From Heaven when He wants
He say “be” and His wish is fulfilled
“Be” and so was Africa!
The word is a weapon and a therapy
Sometimes it bleeds sometimes it heals
Between the Black and the Negro,
the first is a color but the second is a merit
But in terms of its story told, its past told,
on the other side of the countries
The version that we have beheld, its past told
it is not contradictory to the one to countries
The version that we have been finally reported
Is it not contradictory to the one told by the griot Konte?
Africa is speaking to you and it instructs me to convey this...


Women repeatedly singing the same brief lyrics *

Lend your ears to the wind of history
And you’ll hear secrets, secreted in secret
It is ancient Egypt that calls on the theory of the Aryan race
To drink at the source of knowledge of Timbuktu
All Bantus men and women were coming from everywhere.
Do you agree with me to say that:
If man is a being of reason by nature, and
If Africa is the cradle of humanity according to science.
Therefore it is also the cradle of intelligence and science.
So why when 2Batoro is ringing his balafon
Nothing calls your subsoil; to look civilized you prefer the violin.
When Djeliba pinches his kora, to look civilized, you prefer the opera.
When Ibrahim Ologuem plays his djembe djembe is to wish you
“ an badew salam an hou aw sambe sambe”
“You my Muslim brothers happy new year”
Rather Come listen to them and you will know that:
Africa is land of lands, mother land and brother land, nourishing land
but so why be silent?


Women repeatedly singing the same brief lyrics *

Culture, Yes!
-Culture is nothing but the relationship
of the individual to his environment
If you change, it changes.
This is why the toubaboo tche (you white man)
I accept your lemonade, but I do not forget my zom koom
(water of flour)
I accept your pizza, but I do not forget my benga (bean)
If I accept your jacket, tie,
it is because I know it’s my cotton it’s B.A.B.A (father).
Give and give; Win and win.
Give and give; Win and win.
This is how Africa speaks to you.
She instructs me to transmit to you this:
The next migration
It is sure
It will be towards Africa.
I am sure.

Don Sharp singing and the females singing the same brief lyrics as they previously sung in response to his singing; Don Sharp ending by saying something in French(?)

-snip-
*This transcription doesn't include the spelling with accent marks for a few of these words. It also doesn't include what the women sang or what what Don Sharp sang and said towards the end and at the end of this video.

If you understood what was sung and spoken, please share that information and what language or languages they sung/spoke. Thank you.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Burkina Faso Singer Dez Altino, The National Prince - "Wende Ya Wende" (with Lyrics & English translation) And "Ya Woto" (with English summary)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about Burkina Faso, West Africa and information about Burkinabé singer Dez Altino.

This post also showcases two YouTube videos of Dez Altino's songs and includes the lyrics for one of those songs and a summary in English for the song.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes..

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Dez Altino for his musical legacy. Thanks also for all those who are quoted in this post. Special thanks to Cysii Cysii for responding to my request for information about the song given as Example #2 below. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT BURKINA FASO
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burkina_Faso
"Burkina Faso ... is a landlocked country in West Africa. It covers an area of around 274,200 square kilometres (105,900 sq mi) and is surrounded by six countries: Mali to the north; Niger to the east; Benin to the southeast; Togo and Ghana to the south; and Ivory Coast to the southwest. Its capital is Ouagadougou. In 2014 its population was estimated at just over 17.3 million.[8] Burkina Faso is a francophone country, with French as an official language of government and business. Formerly called the Republic of Upper Volta (1958–1984), the country was renamed "Burkina Faso" on 4 August 1984 by then-President Thomas Sankara. Its citizens are known as Burkinabé (/bɜːrˈkiːnəbeɪ/ bur-KEE-nə-beh).

[...]

Ethnic groups
Burkina Faso's 17.3 million people belong to two major West African ethnic cultural groups—the Voltaic and the Mande (whose common language is Dioula). The Voltaic Mossi make up about one-half of the population. The Mossi claim descent from warriors who migrated to present-day Burkina Faso from northern Ghana around 1100 AD. They established an empire that lasted more than 800 years. Predominantly farmers, the Mossi kingdom is led by the Mogho Naba, whose court is in Ouagadougou.[78]

Languages
Burkina Faso is a multilingual country. An estimated 69 languages are spoken there,[82] of which about 60 languages are indigenous. The Mossi language (Mossi: Mòoré) is spoken by about 40% of the population, mainly in the central region around the capital, Ouagadougou, along with other, closely related Gurunsi languages scattered throughout Burkina.

In the west, Mande languages are widely spoken, the most predominant being Dyula (also known as Jula or Dioula), others including Bobo, Samo, and Marka. The Fula language (Fula: Fulfulde, French: Peuhl) is widespread, particularly in the north. The Gourmanché language is spoken in the east, while the Bissa language is spoken in the south.

The official language is French, which was introduced during the colonial period. French is the principal language of administrative, political and judicial institutions, public services, and the press. It is the only language for laws, administration and courts."...

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INFORMATION ABOUT DEZ ALTINO
From https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://www.refletafrique.net/spip.php%3Farticle2082&prev=search DEZ ALTINO: ALREADY 10 YEARS OF MUSICAL CAREER: "A POSITIVE BALANCE" ACCORDING TO THE ARTIST.September 10, 2016 Country: Burkina Faso
"Dez Altino is a renowned Burkinabé music artist. Désiré Ouédraogo at the civil status, today, he also answers to the name of " National Prince ".

He arrived on the Burkinabè musical scene in 2006. After having passed through a phase of stammering, He manages somehow to impose his voice in almost all regions of the country. " Since the beginning of my career, I've had some difficult but good times. Thanks to my fans I make a positive assessment. The fans are my pillars. We are able to meet the different challenges".

September 06, 2016, the National Prince and all his staff were facing journalists and music lovers. The event, which began at 5 pm at the Reemdogo Music Garden in Ouagadougou, is actually the beginning of the celebration. Here, the artist gives the program of the celebration of his 10 good years in music. At this meeting, Dez Altino saw the presence of some Burkinabe artists like Floby, Wendy, Imilo, who came to show their support.

Note that it is under the theme, " Burkinabe music and international challenges " that this holiday will be celebrated to " thank you all ". He intends to work with national and international media channels for wider dissemination of Burkinabe music. " It's my way of contributing to the spread and promotion of Burkinabe music here and around the world .

[...]

The National Prince gives thanks to God and thanks his fans and especially all those who accompany him in the pursuit of his destiny. He dedicates to them his 5th album entitled "Barka" in the Mooré language which means " thank you ". " I named this album" Barka "to say thank you to all my fans for everything they have done for me since the beginning (...) ". He explained.

Through this event, the artist officially presented his new album. An album with multiple colorations, composed of 08 original and diversified titles, sung in Zouk, Liwaga, Warba, etc.

Love, forgiveness, peace, life, hope, death are among the topics discussed in "Barka". He said that the 7th title named Burkina Faso is a way for him to pay tribute to his country. “...

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From https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dez_Altino&prev=search
"Dez Altino , whose real name is Tiga Wendwaoga Désiré Ouédraogo 1 , is a Burkinabé singer (author, composer, performer). He is part of the rising generation of modern Burkinabe music. But, its particularity is that it is inspired by traditional rhythms like Liwaga and Wiire .

In 2013, he won the 13th Kundé d'Or, rewarding the best Burkinabe artist of the year."

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From https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=https://www.musicinafrica.net/node/11914&prev=search
"The national prince as he is called, Dez Altino is a born ambiancer. His music is a mix of traditional Wiire and Liwaga beats accompanied by a good dose of technology. In 2013, he was awarded the Golden Kundé which distinguishes the Burkinabe artist of the year."
-snip-
I think that the word "ambiancer" means something like "crooner"; "a male singer who sings slow, romantic songs in a soft, smooth voice." https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/crooner. Corrections are welcome.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS:
Example #1: Dez Altino - Wende Ya Wende



TACKBORSE, Published on May 7, 2015
-snip-
LYRICS: WENDE YA WENDE
(Dez Altino)

San Pa Wendé (Except God)
San Pa Wendé (Except God)
San pa Wendé! (Except God)
Nèd pa toinyé (no one can)
San Pa Wendé (Except God)
San Pa Wendé (Except God)
San pa Wendé! (Except God)
Nèd pa toinyé (no one can)

Tongue Be Wendé (Wealth depends on God)
Laafi Be Wendé (Health depends on God)
Naam Be Wendé (The power depends on God)
Ligda leads ya Wendé (Money also depends on God)

San Pa Wendé (Except God)
San Pa Wendé (Except God)
San pa Wendé! (Except God)
Nèd pa toinyé (Nobody can)

If loèya bè loké (The one who has knotted has only undone)
If boussa bè bouk bala (The one who has buried has only to unearthed only)
Ned pa kida a ba yaam daar ye (No one dies the day that his enemy wishes)
Wend san pa kou naaba pa koudyé! (If God does not order the leader can not ordain)
Wend boulgue kon koogue koom (The well of God never stops)
Rasmpouigue lélogo kogue tiigui viind Wendé (The climbing plant of a desert place in the absence of a tree clings to God)

San Pa Wendé (Except God)
San Pa Wendé (Except God)
Nèd pa toinyé (Nobody can)
Wend ya Wendé (God is God)
Nèd pa toinyé (Nobody can)
Wend ya Wendé (God is God)
Nèd pa toinyé (Nobody can)
Wend ya Wendé (God is God)
Nèd pa toinyé (Nobody can)

Nèba fan Wendé (the God of everyone)
If taara pang Wendé (The God of the strong)
Pa taara pang Wendé (The God of the weak)
The God of the good, the God of the wicked

San Pa Wendé (Except God)
San Pa Wendé (Except God)
San pa Wendé! (Except God)
Nèd pa toinyé (Nobody can)

Ya woto! (That's so) Illiassou Moriba
Prince Hakim! Rabem pa, bless you! (The madman does not know the notion of fear)
Ya mam la Dez Altino, I am the national prince
Prince Hakim plays here!
Nedpa nong fo manda fo bouin? (If someone does not like you, what does it do to you?)
Ned ka Wendé na dik teng the tid ra kin yé! (No one is God to steal the earth under our feet)
Ned ka Wendé na kok saag la ta ra ni logue! (There is no God to prevent the rain from falling)
Ned ka Wendé na kok pepsum tid ra you! (No one is God to confiscate the air and prevent us from breathing)
The dog barks the trailer moves on
Kuilgue san da toin yank yonre ned pa ketin Dounia (If the sacred river could take away life nobody would be alive on earth)
Drissa Zongo! Ad yél bé nè Wendé! (It's God who is strong)
Omar Mitib kièta! San ka Wendé! (Except God)
Tantie Bintou Cisse! Ad yél bé nè Wendé! (It's God who is strong)
Arouna from Miami! It's God who does everything

Wend ya Wendé (God is God)
Nèd pa toinyé (Nobody can)
Wend ya Wendé (God is God)
Nèd pa toinyé (Nobody can)

It is God who gives everything, none can against his will
He does what he wants, do not force God
Sing! Oyé Wendé
Shout! Let's jump for joy because God is really in control
My fans got away, those who love me say
Because God is really in control
Wend ya Wendé (God is God)




This article has been submitted by Burkindi
Burkina Faso"
From https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://afrikilyrics.com/fr/2016/10/dez-altino-wend-ya-wende-paroles-et-traduction/&prev=search

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Example #2: DEZ ALTINO - Ya Woto [Clip Officiel 2017]



DEZ ALTINO OFFICIELLE, Published on Feb 16, 2017

Ya Woto le nouveau single DEZ ALTINO le Prince National.

ABONNEZ-VOUS À LA CHAINE OFFICIEL :
-snip-
SONG SUMMARY
[Pancocojams Editor: This summary was written in response to my comment posted to this video's discussion thread in the beginning of April 2017 for an English summary (if not the lyrics) for this song.

Cysii Cysii, April 2017
"Azizi Powell .I hope I am not too late.The language is Mooré from the Mossi tribe of Burkina Faso.Ya woto means it is like that or that's the way it is.

He is basically saying that there is different type of people on earth,some people praise what you are doing and other people don't ,they try to undermine you.He is saying that that's how life is,we can't like the same things and we can't have the same views,but still you have to keep going forward.That's it basically."
-snip-
The lyrics given above for the song "Wende Ya Wende" includes this English translation for "Ya woto!"= "That's so".

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Sunday, April 22, 2018

Gospelized Spiritual & Other Non-Traditional Examples Of The African American Spiritual "Trampin"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part III of a three part pancocojams series on the African American Spiritual "Trampin'".

This post showcases some "non-traditional" African American YouTube examples of the "Spiritual" Trampin. (Note that one of these examples (given as Example #3 below) is sung by Rock & Roll great "Little Richard".

The Addendum to Part III showcases an example of "Trampin" that was recorded by the White American singer Patti Smith as that version appears to be the most widely known example of this song (based on Google searches).

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/edward-boatner-earliest-known-arranger.html for Part I of this series. Part I presents excerpts of two online biographical articles about Edward Boatner. The Addendum to that post includes additional online references to Edward Boatner as well as comments about the song "Trampin" from the online folk music forum "Mudcat".

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/04/youtube-examples-of-traditional.html for Part II of this series. Part II provides definitions for the word "trampin(g)" and includes some examples of floating verses from Spirituals which have been used in the renditions of "Trampin". Part II also showcases some YouTube examples of "traditional" renditions of "Trampin".

The content of this post is presented for religious and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in the YouTube examples that are embedded in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these songs on YouTube.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
"African American Spirituals" is the term that I prefer to use for that body of music that has generally been referred to as "Negro Spirituals". I prefer the term "African American Spirituals" because "African American" is the formal term for this population as it replaced the outdated and now largely considered offensive term "Negro" in the 1970s.

It's my position that "spirituals" usually refers to certain religious songs composed by unknown Black Americans prior to the end of the 19th century. According to that position, I usually categorize religious songs that were and are composed by African Americans (or others) after the 19th century in the early 20th century -even those that have the same structure/s as Spirituals are usually categorized as "early Gospel" songs. I also used the term "Gospelized Spirituals" to describe arrangements of Spirituals in an African American Gospel style.

In the context of this post, the word "non-traditional" is used to refer to arrangements that I believe differ in some way or ways from the tune, tempo, and structure, and usually also in lyrics, to early collected or recorded arrangements of African American Spirituals. Many, but not all of these examples have more "gospelized" styles and/or more uptempo than the traditional arrangements.

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DEFINITIONS FOR THE VERB "TRAMPIN(G)"
From https://www.thefreedictionary.com/tramping
"tramp (trămp)
v. tramped, tramp·ing, tramps
v.intr.
1. To walk with a firm, heavy step; trudge.
2.
a. To travel on foot; hike."

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https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tramp
"Definition of tramp
intransitive verb
1 : to walk, tread, or step especially heavily tramped loudly on the stairs
2 a : to travel about on foot : hike
b : to journey as a tramp
transitive verb
1 : to tread on forcibly and repeatedly
2 : to travel or wander through or over on foot have tramped all the woods on their property"
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
I've included these definitions because the verb "trampin(g)" is rarely used nowadays in conversational English.
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
I've included these definitions because the verb "trampin(g)" is rarely used nowadays in conversational English.

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SHOWCASE YOUTUBE EXAMPLES
Example #1: Helen Robinson Youth Choir singing Trampin



Gospellin, Published on Feb 17, 2009

Jeanette Robinson on the lead
-snip-
Here's a comment from that video's publisher:
gospellin, 2009
"It'a an old Negro spiritual that has been re-arranged it's Trampin'.The record label also reads Trampin."

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Example #2: Trampin'



Regina Carter – Topic, Published on Nov 8, 2014
Provided to YouTube by Sony Music Entertainment

Trampin' · Regina Carter

Southern Comfort

℗ 2013 Regina Carter, under exclusive license to Sony Music Entertainment

Released on: 2014-02-28

Composer: Traditional / Traditional / トラディショナル
Bass, Programmer, Arranger: Jesse Murphy


Released on: 2000-01-01

Auto-generated by YouTube.

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Example #3: I'm Trampin'



Little Richard - Topic
Published on Nov 5, 2014
Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

I'm Trampin' · Little Richard

Long Tall Sally (Live)

℗ 2012 Dance Plant Records/TMC

Released on: 2012-05-10

Memphis Gospel Quartet Heritage, The 1980's: Happy in the Service of the Lord Volume 1
℗ 2000 Highwater Records
-snip-
Here are my transcriptions of the two floating verses that Little Richard sung as lead to this song:

Must Jesus Bare the cross alone
And all the world go free
Yes there’s a cross for everyone
And there’s a cross for me


Amazing grace how street the sound
that saved a wrench like me
I once was lost but now I’m found
was blind but now I see

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Example #4: TRAMPIN'



Carl Wells, Published on Oct 22, 2016

Trampin'

Song arr. by Dr. Carl R. Wells
For the John Work Chorus
Of the Former Booker T. Washington High School

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Example #4: Trampin'

Regina Carter – Topic, Published on Nov 8, 2014
Provided to YouTube by Sony Music Entertainment

Trampin' · Regina Carter

Southern Comfort

℗ 2013 Regina Carter, under exclusive license to Sony Music Entertainment

Released on: 2014-02-28

Composer: Traditional / Traditional / トラディショナル
Bass, Programmer, Arranger: Jesse Murphy

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Example #5: Marian Anderson - "Trampin'"



Jenkem Chic, Published on Jul 31, 2017

20's Gospel/Musical version of "Trampin'" by Marian Anderson.
-snip-
Marion Anderson's rendition of "Trampin" is operatic. It's tempo is much slower than traditional renditions of this Spiritual that I have heard and sung.

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ADDENDUM- Patti Smith's rendition of "Trampin"

Patti Smith Trampin'



macamaranik, Published on Sep 1, 2011
LYRICS
I'm trampin', trampin' Try'n a make heaven my home
I'm trampin trampin Try'n a make heaven my home...

I've never been to heaven But I've been told
Try'n a make heaven my home That the streets up there
Are paved with gold Try'n a make heaven my home

I'm trampin trampin Try'n a make heaven my home
I'm trampin trampin Try'n a make heaven my home...

-snip-
Here's some information about Patti Smith's version of "Trampin" from http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=32693
"Album: Trampin'
Released: 2004
“Patti Smith closes her Trampin' album with this title track, which is a traditional folk song written in the Gospel tradition. It is a collaboration between Smith's daughter Jesse Lee Smith's piano and Patti's voice. She explained to Uncut magazine October 2004: "I like Marion Anderson and I have a little space where I paint and take photographs and I often listen to Gospel records and spirituals. That little song, for the past couple of years, has always attracted me, and I asked my daughter if she would learn it on piano. That's my daughter playing and it's live, we just did it a couple of times and took one that was honest. And that's what we did. I'm very proud of her, I think she did a beautiful job. And I intentionally wanted it to have a modest approach, because it is a spiritual and I'm certainly not Marion Anderson. I intentionally wanted the song to have a very reflective, modest feel."
Smith said that she was attracted to the song as, "it does have a weary quality but it's optimistic." She added: "This person is trampin' trying to find Heaven, they're not just trying to get to the corner store, or just trying to get to a soup kitchen, they're going for the highest place. I like the little song, and there's a lot of miles tramped in this album, and I think it was a good way to end it." “

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This concludes this three part series on "Trampin".

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