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Monday, October 23, 2017

Selected Comments From The YouTube Discussion Thread For "Nigerians Murder South African Dance Step "Gwara Gwara"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a video entitled "Nigerians Murder South African Dance Step 'Gwara Gwara' ".

This post also provides information about South Africa's contemporary social dance called "gwara gwara" (also written as gwaragwara") and provides selected selected comments from this video's discussion thread. This compilation documents examples of comments that focus on the dance performance itself as well as the music used for that particular dance performance.

Although some commenters promoted the concept of "One Africa", there was considerable dissension between Africans from various nations. Some Angolan commenters wanted the video publisher to ensure that people knew that the music track was from their nation and not South Africa. And most of the commenters who identified as being from the nation of South Africa refuted the notion that the dance being performed was actually "gwara gwara". Some comments in this compilation also document the negative attitudes some Africans have about "copying" African American culture instead of showcasing African culture/s. In addition, many of the comments between Nigerians and Ghanaians were particularly contentious. I chose not to include any of those contentious comments from that video's discussion thread in this compilation.

Click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghana%E2%80%93Nigeria_relations for historical background information about the tensions between Nigerians and Ghanaians. Also, click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenophobia_in_South_Africa for information about the xenophobia in South Africa.

Some of the comments that are included in this compilation document the desire to promote African unity and the desire to "rep" one's own African nation.

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The content of this post is provided for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the originator of the "Gwara Gwara" dance, and thanks to all those who are featured in this video. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of these videos on YouTube.
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/five-videos-of-south-african-gwara.html for more information and video examples of this dance.

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE "GWARA GWARA DANCE"
What is "Gwara Gwara"?
"Gwara Gwara" is a social dance that began trending in South Africa in 2016 thanks to its performance and promotion by South African dancer DJ Bongz.

In the discussion thread for this YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tj9pBAXJXzM, commenter Vodacom Mkhize (2016) responded to the question "What does "Gwara Gwara" means with this statement:
"It's a bird, it's a variation of gwala gwala/ligwalagwala/igwalagwala, a Zulu/Ndebele bird (maybe an African parrot) which was used by kings like Shaka to honour a brave person. The dance is from the moves of the bird, but it's better to ask the inventors anyway."

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SHOWCASE VIDEO: Nigerians murder South African dance step Gwara Gwara (aii zenze) *Subscribe*




eloswag, Published on Mar 30, 2017
Nigerian act "Eloswag dances with friend's PG x Shalom in new video

[...]

Music: "Zenze (feat. Eddy Tussa
-snip-
In this title the word “murder” is an African American Vernacular English term that means "to dance very well".

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SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD

All of these selected comments are from 2017.

In addition to comments about the dancing and the music, I'm particularly interested in examples of the use of African American Vernacular English, Nigerian Pidgin English, and Mzansi Kasi (South African township) slang.

These comments are numbered for referencing purposes only.

1. eloswag
"wanna apologize for not dancing the Gwara Gwara steps till the end, i just needed to promote us all (Africa as a whole) i love South Africans as much as i love the rest of Africa, So im dropping an apology dance Video for the Southy peeps, Nasty C's NDA #anticipate and please SUBSCRIBE LOTS OF LOVE PEOPLE AFRICA TO THE WORLD, Btw I'm Nigerian, please check my other videos"

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Reply
2. LoveDancePray319
"eloswag we still love you!! I am proudly African before I am South African!! Y'all killed the dancing especially the guy in black!"

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Reply
3. sweetnurse mcgee
"eloswag Yo no apology is needed let me just say I am grateful that your making videos about African dances. As a Black in U.S I yearn for more exposure to my ancestors culture!!! Thank you.."

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Reply
4. anele mtiki
"eloswag apology accepted bro😊go on do your thing homie. one Africa for all"

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5. MzRas Kandi
"eloswag the dude in black. boy u did that. take it from a South African, u really convinced me. keep spreading the love all over Africa 😍"

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6. Thula Nyoni
"Whetin! This be no gwaragwara oga abeg!"

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7. Trisha Dichabe
"This isn't even close to gwara if you search up gwara gwara dance South Africa they will show you the real ting"

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8. arinic7
"Jamaicans been doing those dances"

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9. Adel Ades
"Not gwara gwara I guess, but still gotta love 9ja peeps! :)"

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10. Cet'Ani Sfaqi
"see where Chris get his moves from"
-snip-
"Chris" = African American R&B singer Chris Brown, who is known for his dancing skills

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11. Joice Boa
"That's kuduro from: Angola"

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12. Zwavhudi Mulelu
"Aye aye aye guy in black got moves..."

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13. landy ntshangase
"ehhh the slim guy though, ahhh ma guy you killed whatever dance you were doing, but that's not even close to Gwara Gwara... babazani bo!"

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14. Tumizasation Tumi
"the guy in black killed it, but was not gwara gwara, i like his moves they similar to sbojwa dance"

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15. Sofia Ingles
"This music is from Angola and not South Africa my fellow africans :). So proud of your moves!!!"

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16. Maria da costa
"why are they dancing to an Angolan song looool dis is eddy tusa aii zenze...

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Reply
17. eloswag
"is the song restricted to only Angolans???"

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Reply
18. Maria da costa
"eloswag why as in oh wow. not why as in you're not allowed. would be nice if they could state its an Angolan song."

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19. obytrys
"looks like they are Ghanaians.. dance and appearance wise..."

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Reply
20. eloswag
"we Nigerians , schooling in Ghana"

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21. Johannes Fredriks
"whats the name of the artist ans title of the song?"

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Reply
22. Ai Vert
"Johannes Fredriks :
DJ Malvado ft Edy Tussa - Zenze"

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23. Mireille Kiala
"eloswag, this dance and music is from Angola and not South Africa. The dance is called kuduro and the song is sang in Angolan slang (Portuguese and broken Portuguese)!"

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24. Mireille Kiala
"Janeth Camara, thank you 😊! Our famous kuduro dance is very popular in Angola, plus the song is sang in Portuguese and Angolan slang!"

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25. jenny myself
"Who cares they killed it"

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26. Wendy Mabinuori
"the guy in black is jus too effortless abeg! too mad! :D and yes its not all gwara gwara but he did it still and killed it!"

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27. Thobeka Shabane
"don't worry, its still good and I'm South African. :-) ."

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28. ewashington4178
"Siyabonga for the dance..."

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29. sunmisola adebayo
"chai"

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30. Natalie Nice
"the guy in the black...hes sick with it.."

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31. Ifeoluwa Busola
d guy in black killed it😍😍😍

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Reply
32. Onkarabetse Mosopa
"Ifeoluwa Busola too much"

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33. Pumeza Ganto
"nobody can define better gwara moves for us I'm sorry. first of all south African moves are not about violently twitching.....we prefer throwing our swag smoothly check the blessers party.And I repeat as long as you are dancing to other music you won't nail our style. it's like trying to dance azonto to Justin biebers I'm sorry song.I know we have the most amazing and adorable moves also that any dance style from any country we are able to master,but I know for a fact south African moves are tough to master for other people.we dance shoki dance to Ghana or naija music not south African music, we also dance to kwassa dance and tombolo to Congolese music Bcoz that's how the dance moves come from.
So please don't explain our judgement to us.we know this....you're the one who doesn't. one thing these dancers have is flexibity at least."

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Reply
34. Audrey Gene
"Pumeza Ganto chill,we know the gwara dance is yo stuff...Africa is huge nd we learn from different countries nd their people different things..I personally think that it was really cool of them to try out what South Africa does..im proud that at least even if we dont really know abt each others cultures,we are all African nd AT LEAST we unite through our music nd dance...if we can't unite through what brings humanity together..music nd dancing nd be one Africa,who will? Don't get me wrong,i get what u mean..but just try to have more fun nd don't take it personal..Positivity is good stuff!πŸ˜œπŸ˜€πŸ˜€πŸ‘"

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Reply
35. Leah Princess
"Pumeza Ganto πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚from ANY COUNTRY?πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚"

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36. DeeDee Nicole 123
"Haters in this comment section they did a bit of it not the whole thing.. Maybe if you finished watching the video then you would know it was like a snippet of it !!!! Smh"

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37. KWEEN YAA ASANTEWAA
"AYYYE GIVE US THAT WORK KING!!!!!"

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38. Avida Myers
"Big Shout Out to Africa πŸ‘Š❤"

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39. one uup
"I thought someone literally got killed. Folks need to start using the right words about what is going on."

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40. YouAwakeYet
"I thought Nigerians killed a South African dancer, I'm glad its actual dancing"

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41. Laddy Gibbions
"Why don't some African people look
and Dress their culture?. They look
like American Black
people!. Be authentic
Quit assimilating into
the American culture!.
Stop it I love the way
it was in Africa 60
years ago with culture
and dress!."

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42. RedboiC
"you have enough hating internet trolls commenting so I'll say this.. keep doing you man. Y'all killed those dance moves period so keep dancing and making people mad in the process. Stay up, God Bless"

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43. Trei Godhead
"this no gwara gwara but they sure can dance"

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Reply
44. Red Carded
"whether it was or not, it was danced better than some pips I usually see on youtube, so well done to the guy in black,"

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45. Rosalia Endjila
"The guy in the black πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯"

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46. Edson Paunde
"this is Angolan. Kuduro. atleast the music. Portuguese is being spoken here"

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Reply
47. Manuel Malungo
"Edson Paunde The language in the song is actually kimbundo, one of the local languages in Angola, not Portuguese."

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Reply
48. Antoniela Da Silva
"Plus this isn't kuduro more like house"

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49. Pumeza Ganto
"what is nonsense? That they are flexible but aren't dancing our moves? Please go and sit down.if they invent a dance move for Nigeria and practice that one and showcasing that maybe us non nigerians can appreciate their undiluted talent.you want us to agree that this is how we do ? coz it's not.And they should have been expecting critic when they put their video out.so they should shut up and deliver. of course they are gifted but not in south African kind of gifted.are you mad Bcoz Nigeria has not yet had their own original disco dance moves? it's not about nationality....it's about honesty.it's not about illiteracy....or genius, it's about the title they put out." nigerians killing south African dance" which ain't the case. nothing south African was showcased and nothing was killed. And yes we know Azonto is Ghanaian, gwara bhenga are south African, tombolo and kwassa is Congolese.....what then is nigerian? so until authenticate naija stuff is showcased we will talk we won't let no one snub our art.enough with fakery forgery and 419 moves for once be synthetic or be willing to learn.I'm south African by the way.....And how's your day so far?"

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Reply
50. DeeDee Nicole 123
"Bro it was there like just a little snippet of it they didn't do it on the whole damn video smh don't hate, appreciate good dance moves"

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51. Phindile Phindile
"I will never understand guys who feel comfortable doing this dance move 0:59"

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Reply
52. Samson Idoko
"Phindile Phindile It's just dance. It's an art and it can come in any form. You need to understand dance first and what it entails."

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Reply
53. celyncapo
"Phindile Phindile I was thinking the same thing . He was doing soo good until he started popping his booty like a girl at the club.. he had me 😍 until then .. they can dance their butts of tho"

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Reply
54. Chief Jay Binns
"OMG, Only AMERICANS feel this way. #Culture"

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Reply
55. celyncapo
"Chief Jay Binns I love how y'all always say get some culture but you guys copy the way hwe rap and how we dress.. lmao"

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Reply
56. Chief Jay Binns
"celyncapo thanks for the compliment, but I'm actually a black American-Not - simply defending and acknowledging the cultural difference."

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57. lorrenzo mokgosana
"i like the moves ,one love Africa"

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58. Daughter of Zion
"Dude in the black is litπŸ”₯"

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59. BoogiMan Ultrasphinx
"You this is so hot I'm an African American and this just shows how much all Africans are alike! this could have been Jamaicans, Trinidadian, Brazilian....we're all the same! keep them coming...and please post the songs and the artists. I need those songs! Peace and love from Brooklyn U.S."

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60. Mbali
"A Nigerian cannot say it's better than SA in dance. And SA cannot say it's better than Nigeria in dance. You see where I'm going with this? Bias"

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61. Melanie Ayako
"Man I love my people!"

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62. Zee G
"haahhahahahahhahahahahhaah u must be joking ey, is not even close to Gwara gwara"

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Reply
63. Nqobile Mabaso
"Zee G my thoughts exactly"

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Reply
64. Lotoya Peart
"Zee G hater"

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Reply
65. Zee G
"Latoya are you for real, what to hate here"

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Reply
66. Lotoya Peart
"They rocking !!!!! Except the boy with his shirt off. Can you dance like that ? I think not !!! Stop hating it's a serious crime ...lol"

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Reply
67. Pumeza Ganto
"flexible dancers....yes.south African moves....no.if you guys want to excel take the critic.sorry we won't smother you with lies.go back to the drawing table....look at south African dance moves,practice and make other videos then you'll be good. the group of guys from Maputo master our pantsula dance moves like that they danced to dj cleos music."

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Reply
68. Imagine Wonderz
"I loved it either way tho. I get what you're saying , they shouldn't label it as thing if it isn't but I just love to see them enjoying dancing."

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Reply
69. Yessenia Roca
"still dope... made me wanna dance lol"

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70. ZUKISWA BABALWA Nonkunzi
" I came for our gwaragwara there's no gwaragwara here...I'm not surprised hence no one can do our dance better than us"

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71. Hishee Ward
"I love my Nigerian long distance family shots out from America"

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72. C. Diamonds
"I don't give a rat behind if they're not doing the full gwara gwara they all dance damn good.
I'm looking at the background, land and house and felt like I was "home".
One Love to Africa and all Africans.✊❤"

**
73. lulu 111
"Work it"

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74. Tamires Mango
"c'est du kuduru"

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75. Bernadette Madondo
"I can't believe these dance moves have turned into S.A vs the rest of Africa. NOBODY claimed anything, they just said they "murdered the gwara gwara" in their statement. Some people here need to chill...we don't need xenophobia on dancing too.
Dude in black, you flexible...and tall brother, I need that waist!!!"

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76. Tay Diva
"Showing some love from the USA. Keep the culture Alive😍😍😍😍😍😍"

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77. pretty selected
"unity ✌πŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒ loving it all the way from South Africa πŸ˜‰ even though there's not much of gwara gwara going on haha"

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78. Sauvageee
"The only person that murdered anything is the guy in black."

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79. junior torres
"Beyonce and Chakira can you see how is done"
-snip-
Beyonce- African American R&B superstar who is also known for her dancing; Chakira (Shakira), Brazilian Pop singer who is also known for her dancing

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80. SIYABULELA JAMELA
"Love and support from South Africa. We need to stick and learn to our cultures rather than copying Americans. Good work brother!"

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81. Okoye Paul
"eloswag be killing it!!!!"

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Reply
82. Rashad hellooo woorld
"They did not kill this at all..πŸ‘Ž"

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83. Sydney Malatsi
"Great moves. I like the energy. Good choice of music. Sounds Angolan ..I know this because Angolan dance beat is very similar to our dance beats (South Africa). Great to see Nigeria also embracing the beat. Much love"

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84. dee dee johnson
"which one is eloswag the guy in all black or the guy in the blue jeans?"

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Reply
85. Chris Macdonald
"dee dee johnson obviously the Nigerian guy in all black."

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86. sweetlike candy
"i love how african guys move they hips.... its so sexy... stiff ass american men just wanna pop and nae nae and dab [profanity abbreviation deleted]!!!"

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87. noxizle 4 shizle
"Hahahaha , Mzansi kasi dance can not be replicated in Nigeria, its not the same. Nigerians are never going to dance better than South Africans with regard to this music. COME AGAIN BRAH. Stop lying...

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87. Priscella McPherson
"oh wow! I know some Jamaicans who move like this! This is where all the rhythm come from, the countries of Africa!"

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88. rizaan E
"This is litπŸ”₯πŸ”₯ I love the fact that y'all tried to do what we doπŸ˜‹ let's learn from one another"

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89. Nothile Mhlongo
"I knew this was going to be some mess. Please Nigeria, for the sake of Everyone, Invent your moves and just stick to that. Leave South African moves alone, leave Ghana moves alone. Just do You."

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Reply
90. Kamar G
"Chill. No need for fighting. We are all African or in my case African descended. I am African American and we started most music forms in the States but all those forms have roots in Africa and when I see you dance it reminds me of how we dance and I see the connection. Much respect to you all and keep sharing the gifts...btw...brother in the black tore it up. He made me want to get in the video and put my spin on it. And who is this song by?"

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91. Zandile Dlamini
"I'm South African. I loved this πŸ™ŒπŸ½πŸ™ŒπŸ½ The fusion of cultures is awesome!!"

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92. prettyslim2010
"all while having flip flops on! πŸ˜‚
y'all go with your bad selves"

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93. John McClenon
"Music reminds me of Osibisa from the 70's!"

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94. My Opinion
"Please.......we were doing lots of those moves in the gay clubs years ago."

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95. Zurisadai Hernandez
"Am I the only one that feels like I'm listening to cumbia..? Like Celia is about to rise up from her grave.. Lol.."

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96. Titayamileth Lourenco
"Well πŸ˜’πŸ˜³πŸ˜I didn't know that Nigeria do. sing in Kimbundu ( or North Mbundu, one of Bantu languages spoken in Angola πŸ‡¦πŸ‡΄) I πŸ‘‚πŸΎ a mix of Semba and Kuduro. You can search for yourself cames from Angola πŸ‡¦πŸ‡΄ too 😁😁"

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97. Chattown
"yeah The one in the BLK did that..."

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98. HAVE FUN WITHYOURSTYLES
"Yes the one in black gave me life...... I love his moves"

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99. Phronesis7
"They killed it alright, but please take the Gwara Gwara and SA out of the description. They didnt even do the Gwara Gwara!"

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100. denike
"Why are you upset with us na. atleast we tried. oya show me nija dance, can u do azonto, or galala, or shoki or swor.......anyone? you see"

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Five Videos Of The South African "Gwara Gwara Dance" (information & videos)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about South Africa's contemporary social dance called "gwara gwara" (also written as gwaragwara") and showcases five YouTube videos of that dance.

The content of this post is provided for folkloric, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the DJ Bongz, the originator of this dance, and thanks to all those who are featured in these videos. Thanks also to the composers and performers of the music which is featured in these videos. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/selected-comments-from-youtube.html for the pancocojams post entitled Selected Comments From The YouTube Discussion Thread For "Nigerians Murder South African Dance Step "Gwara Gwara".

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE "GWARA GWARA DANCE"
What is "Gwara Gwara"?
"Gwara Gwara" is a social dance that began trending in South Africa in 2016 thanks to its performance and promotion by South African dancer DJ Bongz. The earliest YouTube video of this dance that I've found was published by DURBANDANCE on January 22, 2016 and is entitled "Tarabha DJ Bongz #MrGwara Gwara Dance" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOxo89zY2so
(805,853 views as of October 22, 2017 4:27 PM EDT). That video is given below as Example #1.

Another early video of this dance "Dj bongz Gwaragwara dance compilation" (109,986 views) was published on Feb 27, 2016 by TK Tube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5obClFsN0I The brief summary of that video indicates that this is "dj bongz well known famous dance". That summary may mean that Dj Bongz is a well known famous dancer [in South Africa].

Comparisons Between "Gwara Gwara" And Two Other African Social Dances
All of the "Gwara Gwara" YouTube videos that I've found were published in 2016 and most of the commenters on those videos' discussion threads wrote comments in 2016. Many of those commenters describe "Gwara Gwara" as a very popular social dance in South Africa. In the discussion thread for the video given below as Example #4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt4C1kdTiyM DANCE GWARA GWARA COMPILATION), several Angolan commenters wrote that the "Gwara Gwara" dance was actually the Angolan dance named "Kuduro". Other commenters in the discussion thread for the "SA DANCE GWARA GWARA COMPILATION" video mentioned above wrote that "Gwara Gwara" was like [Ghana's] Azonto dance. However, other commenters refuted that comparison indicating that the two dances are nothing alike.
Pancocojams posts on "Kuduro" and on "Azonto" can be found by using this blog's internal search engine.

The Music Used To Dance "Gwara Gwara"
"Gwara Gwara" appears to be danced [or was danced] to Southern African "House" instrumental music. For example, a commenter in the discussion thread for the Jul 23, 2016 video entitled "Gwara gwara n bhenga dance" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tj9pBAXJXzM indicated that the music track being danced to was "Xoli M - 1000 Hearts". And a munber of commenters indicated that the track that was used in the video given below as Example #4 was the Angolan "House" music track "Wololo" by Dj Maceeya.

What Does The Name "Gwara Gwara" Mean?
In the discussion thread for this YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tj9pBAXJXzM, commenter Vodacom Mkhize (2016) responded to the question "What does "Gwara Gwara" means with this statement:
"It's a bird, it's a variation of gwala gwala/ligwalagwala/igwalagwala, a Zulu/Ndebele bird (maybe an African parrot) which was used by kings like Shaka to honour a brave person. The dance is from the moves of the bird, but it's better to ask the inventors anyway."

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: TARABHA DJ BONGZ #MRGWARA GWARA DANCE



DURBANDANCE, Published on Jan 22, 2016

DJ BONGZ GWARA GWARA CHALLENGE

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Example #2: KIDS DANCE the GWARA GWARA South African DANCE



Courtney Danelli, Published on Mar 18, 2017

The gwara gwara South African dance

GWARA GWARA dance KIDS

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Example #3: BEST SA DANCE gwara gwara



Tebogo Ndou, Published on Mar 15, 2017

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Example #4: SA DANCE GWARA GWARA COMPILATION



TMan Ostrong, Published on Apr 17, 2016

Dj Bongz's Gwara Gwara, The Trending Dance

Watch The Second Episode Here: https://youtu.be/9wFByqn8nZc

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Example #5: Gwaragwara dance tutorial (Basics )



ipfi mbedzi, Published on Sep 2, 2016

If you have always wanted to do the gwaragwara you can start here

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Some Distinctive African American Female Names That Begin With "La"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides some examples of distinctive African American female names that begin with "La".

The content of this post is presented for onomastics and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those are quoted in this post.
-snip-
This post serves as a companion to this pancocojams post about examples of distinctive African American males names that begin with "La": http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/some-distinctive-african-american-male.html

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
According to my reading, African Americans are known to have a larger name pool than most population groups within the United States. Distinctive African American names include names that aren't commonly given in the United States. These names may be from traditional African languages, or from Arabic, or from other languages throughout the world, including certain names from European languages and from Hebrew which aren't that familiar in the United States. Distinctive African American names are also names that are newly created using a number of different strategies. Among those strategies are respelling an already existing name so that it more closely fits how it is pronounced, adding a prefix or a suffix to an already existing name, or adding a prefix or suffix to a variant of an existing name, or to a relatively newly coined name.

My interest in what I refer to as "distinctive" African American given names (meaning "first and middle names") was sparked when I received my "African free name"* "Azizi" in 1968. "African free names" is a term that afrocentric African Americans used in the late 1960s and 1970s to refer to traditional African or Arabic given names (or less often, to African or Arabic first names and last names) that were either chosen by individuals or given to individuals by other people. "Free names" replaced the European/Hebrew birth names which were called "slave names".

"Azizi" is a Swahili form of the Arabic female name "Aziza". In part because of Swahili's close relationship with Arabic, that East African and Central African language was the first traditional African languages that African Americans used as a source for our names and our children's names. Thanks to the availability of published books on African names in the 1970s, more African Americans began choosing given names from Akan, from Yoruba, Zulu, and from certain other traditional African languages.

In my admittedly informal study of African American names, I've noticed that there appears to be certain sound preferences among many African Americans that aren't necessarily shared by other people in the United States. Among those sound preferences are given names that begin with the prefix "La" (pronounced "lah"). There are many more female African American names with the prefix "La", but, as this post shows, there are also a number of male names that begin with that prefix. It seems to me that "being unique" was (and still is to perhaps a somewhat lesser extent) when many African Americans (and some other Americans had) were (are) deciding on given names for their newborns. And I've also noticed that for some African Americans at least by the 1970s, the way that a name was written was almost as important as how the name was pronounced. A name could be spelled "the regular way" or spelled differently to more closely conform to the way it sounds. The first letter in the second syllable could be capitalized and/or an apostrophe or hyphen could separate the first syllable from the second syllable. Less often, the name could include an accent mark. And, as the first excerpt given below, the African American custom of conferring distinctive given names began centuries before the late 1960s and 1970s, although that custom appears to have increased during those decades.

Read my speculation below in the comment section about why I think the "la" prefix for females and males is one of the foremost sound preferences among African Americans.
-snip-
*Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/09/how-i-got-my-african-name.html for the 2011 pancocojams post entitled "How I Got My African Name".

** Of course, all names were "made up" at one time or another.

****
LISTS OF DISTINCTIVE AFRICAN AMERICAN GIVEN FEMALE NAMES THAT BEGIN WITH "LA"
Pancocojams Editor:
Except for this first excerpt, these lists are given in no particular order. These lists are numbered for referencing purposes only.

Note: These "distinctive African American female names" can also be given to females of other races or ethnicities -with "ethnicity" in the United States referring to Latinos (Latinas)/Hispanics. Latinos (Latinas)/Hispanics can be of any race.

EXCERPT #1 [selected examples from that book]
From Proud Heritage: 11,001 Names For Your African-American Baby editor Elza Dinwiddie-Boyd (Avon Books, 1994)

page 310
La - Puckett* documents an early preference for the La phoneme in these names: La Blanche, La Dora, La Eunice, La Fay, La Jeune, La Perle, La Rossie, La Rue Forrest, La Tausca, La Vada, La Verne, La Zora.

Laetitia - A spelling variation of Letitia (see below) found among free black names**, 1800-64

Lahalia -This rhythmical use of La was noted in 1877-1937

page 311
Laney -This unusual given name is found among free black women during the 19th century

Lanieash- Lanieash Lloyd is a West Indian American who lives in Queens, N. Y.

Latia - Latia Curry of New York's Peter Stuyvesant High School is a track and field champion

Latiffah - An African American spelling variation of the Arabic Latifah, which connotes gentle kindness. Rap artist Queen Latifah has given this name new currency.

La Toya - Perhaps the controversial La Toya Jackson of th famed Jackson family can be credited with the proliferation of this name. The Diary of LaToya Hunter: My First Year in Junior High bu LaToya Hunter won this 12-year old a review in the pages of the New York Times.

Latrice*** - Latrice George was a 2003 recipient of a Project Excellence scholarship. Founded by Carl T. Rowan, the fund, during its sixth annual dinner honoring academic excellence, awarded 80 gifted black Washingon, D. C. area high school seniors scholarships totaling $1.3 million.

From the chapter "African Names For Girls" [These are all of the "La" names on this list.]

****
page 398
Laini - Swahili: Sweet and gentle, soft, Laini "Muki" Brown is an aspiring record company executive.

Lama - Arabic: Darkness of lips

Lamis - Arabic; softness to the touch

Lateefah - Arabic: pleasant, gentle woman.

Lateefah - Arabic: Gentle, kind. Queen Latifah is a not always gentle rap artist.

Layla - Swahili: She was born at night.

The chapter "Newly Created Names For Girls" (pages 431-435) of this book lists more than 400 names that begin with the letters "la". Here are 25 names from that list which aren't found on the other lists that are given below are

Lachante
La Chelle
Lachelle
Lacheryl
Ladawn
La Kenya
La Kita
Lakita
La Quan
Laquana
LaRae
Lakresa
La Shanda
La Shante
La Sheena
La' Shona
Latrina
Latavis
Latarsha
Latricia
Lasheba
Lashelle
Lashirelle
Lastarr
Lawanza
-snip-
*Black Names in America: Origins and Usage – 1975
by Newbell Niles Puckett (Author), Murray Heller (Editor)

**In the context of this list, "free black names" means names given to or selected Black Americans who weren't enslaved

*** Regarding the female name "Latrice":
From http://rupaulsdragrace.wikia.com/wiki/Latrice_Royale
Latrice Royale is the stage name of drag performer Timothy Wilcots, best known for competing in the fourth season of RuPaul's Drag Race, and RuPaul's All Stars Drag Race.....

Date of Birth: February 12, 1972"
-snip-
Also, click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RuPaul%27s_Drag_Race for information about and dates for this television series.

****Regarding the Arabic female names given in that list, the only Arabic female names beginning with "La" that I've come across (either directly or indirectly) are the names "Latifah" (also with variant spellings) and the name "Layla" (with variant spellings, particularly "Laila"). Both of these Arabic female names, but particularly "Layla" are quite frequently given to African American girls, regardless of their parents' religion.

****
EXCERPT #2 [selected examples from that website page]
From https://www.behindthename.com/names/letter/l

LADONNA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name DONNA.

LAETITIA f Late Roman, French
Original form of LETITIA, as well as the French form.

LAKEISHA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name KEISHA.*

LAKESHIA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name KESHIA.

LAKISHA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name KISHA.

LAILA (1) f Arabic, English
Variant of LAYLA.

LASHAWN f & m African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name SHAWN.

LASHAY m African American (Rare)
Combination of the popular name prefix La and SHAY (1).

LASHONDA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name SHONDA.

LATANYA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TANYA.

LATASHA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TASHA.

LATEEFAH f Arabic
Variant transcription of LATIFA.

LATIFA f Arabic
Feminine form of LATIF.

LATIFAH f Arabic
Feminine form of LATIF.

LATISHA f African American
Variant of LETITIA.

LATONYA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TONYA.

LATOYA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TOYA.

LAVONE f English (Rare)
Variant of LAVONNE.

LAVONNE f English
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name YVONNE.

LAWANDA f African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name WANDA.

LAYLA f Arabic, English
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
-snip-

*Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/06/the-real-sources-of-female-name-keisha.html The REAL Sources Of The Female Name "Keisha" and http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/06/the-racialization-of-female-name-keisha.html The Racialization Of The Female Name "Keisha" & Its Variants for two pancocojams posts about the female name "Kiesha".

Here's information about the Arabic male name "Latif" from www.behindthename.com/names/letter/l:
"LATIF m Arabic
Means "gentle, kind" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition Ψ§Ω„Ω„Ψ·ΩŠΩ (al-Latif) is one of the 99 names of Allah."

****
EXCERPT #3 [complete listing of "la" names for African American females from that site]
From http://www.babynames.org.uk/african-american-names-list-l.htm
Lacrasha--------- La-Shonna
Lacrecia--------- La-sondra
Lacresia--------- Lataesha
Lacricia--------- Latanna
Lacrishia ------- Latasia
Ladaishia-------- Lataya
La-Dale ----------Lateasia
Ladawn------------La-Teesha
Ladawnah----------Lateia
Ladona -----------Lateica
Ladonne ----------Laticia
La-fara-----------La-Ticia
LaJonel ----------Latitia
La-juana----------Latoiya
Lajuanna----------Latona
Lakasha ----------Latondra
Lakeitha ---------Latonia
LaKendria---------Latonna
Laketta ----------Latonya
La-Keysha --------Latore
Lakitia-----------Latoria
Lakresha ---------Latorray
Lakyta------------Latoya
Lamesha ----------Latreece
Lameshia----------Latreese
Lanecia ----------La-trice
La-Neesa----------Latrina
La-Neisha --------Latrisha
La-Neishah -------Lavern
Laqueinta --------Laverne
Laquenetta -------La-Verne
Laquetta ---------La-Von
Laquinda ---------Lavonn
Laquitta----------LaVonne
La'Rae -----------La'Wanda
Larah ------------La-wanda
Larhonda
La-rhonda
Lashane
Lashanna
Lashaune
Lashaunta
La'Shawn
Lashawna
Lashona
-snip-
Note that some of these female names that are variants of the name "Sean" ("Shawn", "Shon", "Shaun") and that don't end in "a" are actually unisex names as they are also used as male names. Also, names that end in the suffix "von" which don't end in "a" are also unisex names.

That said, the only African American female and male names on that website's names beginning with "l" page are the names "Lavon" and "Lavonne".

Also note that this list of African American names beginning with "La" is an incomplete sample. I know African American females with other names which aren't on that list, including an African American woman in her 50s or 60s who was given the birth name "Lavonda" and an African American female in her late 60s whose name is "La Rue." I also know an African American female in her late 60s who spells her name "Laquita" and not the similar spellings given above. I also know a

****
EXCERPT #4 [complete listing of "la" names for "Black Baby Girl Names" from that site]
From http://www.top-100-baby-names-search.com/black-baby-girl-names.html [These numbers are given on that website]
324 Lacara
325 Ladell
326 Lafyette
327 Lakedra
328 Lakesia
329 Lalique
330 Landon
331 Laquita
332 Larieka
333 Larriel
334 Lashaya
335 Latavia
336 Latresia

*****
Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Friday, October 20, 2017

Some Distinctive African American Male Names That Begin With "La"

Edited by Azizi Powell

[Revised October 11, 2017]

This pancocojams post provides some examples of distinctive African American male names that begin with "La".

The content of this post is presented for onomastics and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those are quoted in this post.
-snip-
The idea for this post came to me after reading about four members of the United States military-Sgt. La David Johnson (African American), Staff Sergeant Bryan Black, Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Johnson, and Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright (White Americans)- who were killed in an ambush on October 4, 2017 in Niger, West Africa.
Click https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_Tongo_Tongo_ambush for information about that ambush. RIP to all who lost their lives in that tragedy.
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/some-distinctive-african-american.html for the companion pancocojams post "Some Distinctive African American Male Names That Begin With "La"

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
According to my reading, African Americans are known to have a larger name pool than most population groups within the United States. Distinctive African American names include names that aren't commonly given in the United States. These names may be from traditional African languages, or from Arabic, or from other languages throughout the world, including certain names from European languages and from Hebrew which aren't that familiar in the United States. Distinctive African American names are also names that are newly created using a number of different strategies. Among those strategies are respelling an already existing name so that it more closely fits how it is pronounced, adding a prefix or a suffix to an already existing name, or adding a prefix or suffix to a variant of an existing name, or to a relatively newly coined name.

My interest in what I refer to as "distinctive" African American given names (meaning "first and middle names") was sparked when I received my "African free name"* "Azizi" in 1968. "African free names" is a term that afrocentric African Americans used in the late 1960s and 1970s to refer to traditional African or Arabic given names (or less often, to African or Arabic first names and last names) that were either chosen by individuals or given to individuals by other people. "Free names" replaced the European/Hebrew birth names which were called "slave names".

"Azizi" is a Swahili form of the Arabic female name "Aziza". In part because of Swahili's close relationship with Arabic, that East African and Central African language was the first traditional African languages that African Americans used as a source for our names and our children's names. Thanks to the availability of published books on African names in the 1970s, more African Americans began choosing given names from Akan, from Yoruba, Zulu, and from certain other traditional African languages.

In my admittedly informal study of African American names, I've noticed that there appears to be certain sound preferences among many African Americans that aren't necessarily shared by other people in the United States. Among those sound preferences are given names that begin with the prefix "La" (pronounced "lah"). There are many more female African American names with the prefix "La", but, as this post shows, there are also a number of male names that begin with that prefix. It seems to me that "being unique" was (and still is to perhaps a somewhat lesser extent) when many African Americans (and some other Americans had) were (are) deciding on given names for their newborns. And I've also noticed that for some African Americans at least by the 1970s, the way that a name was written was almost as important as how the name was pronounced. A name could be spelled "the regular way" or spelled differently to more closely conform to the way it sounds. The first letter in the second syllable could be capitalized and/or an apostrophe or hyphen could separate the first syllable from the second syllable. Less often, the name could include an accent mark. And, as the first excerpt given below, the African American custom of conferring distinctive given names began centuries before the late 1960s and 1970s, although that custom appears to have increased during those decades.

Read my speculation below in the comment section about why I think the "la" prefix for females and males is one of the foremost sound preferences among African Americans.
-snip-
*Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/09/how-i-got-my-african-name.html for the 2011 pancocojams post entitled "How I Got My African Name".

** Of course, all names were "made up" at one time or another.

Note: These "distinctive African American male names" can also be given to males of other races or ethnicities (with "ethnicity" in the United States referring to Latinos (Latinas)/Hispanics. Latinos (Latinas)/Hispanics can be of any race.

****
LISTS OF DISTINCTIVE AFRICAN AMERICAN GIVEN MALE NAMES THAT BEGIN WITH "LA"
Pancocojams Editor:
Except for this first excerpt, these lists are given in no particular order. These lists are numbered for referencing purposes only.

EXCERPT #1 [selected examples]
From Proud Heritage: 11,001 Names For Your African-American Baby editor Elza Dinwiddie-Boyd (Avon Books, 1994)
page 92
"La Quarius - newly created. This name is known among elementary school students in Detroit.

Labert - This name is another demonstration of the African American fondness for blending LA with a wide variety of endings that often make the new name a unique creation.

LaBron - also LeBron. Although used for several generations by black parents, these names smack of that African-American penchant for creating new sounds in naming their children. LeBron Simmons, a noteworthy atorney in Detroit during the 1950s and 1960s, was a staunch advocate for the poor and the underpriviledged.

[...]

Lafayette - Marquis de Lafayette, a French nobleman, joined Gen. Washington's army in 1777. His fame spread throughout the country, and his surname was often taken as a first name by free black and white parents. Rare in the 20th century.


Lamar French: Of the sea. Also Lemar. First used by black parents in the late 19th century. Lamar remains in

[page 93]

frequent use today. Lamar McGriggs played for the New York Giants football team.

[...]

Larnell - Apparently a recent African-American creation, only a few generations old. Also Larney.

[...]

[page 94

LaSalle French: the hall. NBA stalwart LaSalle Rhompson is an Indiana Pacer.

[...]

Laval - An African American original. Laval Perry is the CEO of All American Ford, Inc., the nation's 71st largest black-owned automobile dealership.

Lavar- An African-American original. Also Levar, Le Var, La Var. Popularized in the late 1970s when actor Le Var Burton played Kunte Kinte in the TV miniseries of Alex Haley's Roots.

Lavon - An African American original

Lawanza - Newly created. Lawanza Spears was a cum laude graduate of the class of 1993, Howard University."

[...]
From the chapter "Newly Created names for boys"
[page 217]
Laaris-------------Lajuan-------------Lapreece
Labar--------------Lakendric----------Laprell
Labarius-----------Lakendrick---------La Prese
LaBradford---------Lakim--------------Laquan
Labrando-----------Lakista------------Laquavis
Labrawn------------Lamarcus-----------Laquenton
Lacatron-----------La Mare------------Laquon
Ladall-------------Lamario------------La Ray
Ladaniel-----------Lamaris------------Larmar
Ladarian-----------Lamark ------------Larmel
LaDarrell----------Lamarque-----------Larmell
La Derek-----------Lamarr-------------La Rocque
Ladexter-----------Lameek-------------Larod
Ladrius------------Landell------------La Ron
Lafonzo------------LaNeil-------------Larome
La Jack------------Lanorris-----------Laron
Lajavon------------Lanue--------------Larrick
La Juan------------Laphonso-----------Lashajuan

[page 218]
Lashaud
La Shawn
Lashon
Lashwan
Lathaniel
Latrell
Lavall
Lavalle
La Vance
La Vaughn
Lavar
La Vaughn
Lavaughan
La Vell
La Vonte
Lavoris
La Waan
Lawanza
LaZelle
Laserick"

****
From the chapter "African Names For Boys"

[...]
Lasana Central Africa:A poet of the people

[...]

Lateef = Arabic: Gentle, pleasant one

****
EXCERPT #2
From https://www.behindthename.com/names/gender/masculine/usage/african-american
"LAMAR m English, African American
From a French and English surname, originally from a place name in Normandy, which was derived from Old French la mare meaning "the pool".
LASHAWN f & m African American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name SHAWN.
LASHAY m African American (Rare)
Combination of the popular name prefix La and SHAY (1)."
-snip-
The only other "L" name on this list is "LEBRON m African American (Rare)
Meaning unknown, probably an invented name. This is the name of basketball player LeBron James (1984-)."

****
EXCERPT #3
http://www.babynames.org.uk/african-american-names-list-l.htm
African American Baby Names Dictionary
"La-corey
La-Ron
Ladrus
Lamar
Lamark
Lamarr
Lamont
Lance
Laran
Larent
Larice
Larmar
Laron
Lasean
Lasil
Lason
Lathan
Latrell
Latrivis
Lavan
Lavaughan
Lavernus
Lavon
Lavonne"
-snip-
This list includes seventeen additional names. Nine of those names begin with the letters "Le".

****
EXCERPT #4
From http://www.top-100-baby-names-search.com/black-baby-names-for-boys.html
[Pancocojams Editor: This website purports to list the top Black baby boy names. The numbers listed are the numbers that this site's editors have given for these names.]
"299 La Dorian
300 Labron"

http://www.top-100-baby-names-search.com/black-boys-names.html
"301 Ladarrell
302 Laelim
303 Lamarcus
304 Laquez
305 Latrelle"

****
EXCERPT #5
[Note: Excerpts from thinkbabynames.com don't distinguish between which race or races or ethnic group (meaning Latino/Hispanic) uses or used these names]
From http://www.thinkbabynames.com/start/1/La
“La- baby names and what they mean with 77 results. La- names are used more often as feminine names. Usage of these boy names was at its apex in the 1940s ... and is now much less... with names like Laurence going out of style. The most fashionable birth names in this list are Lawson (#438), Langston (#691), Lachlan (#768), Lane (#296) and Layton (#544), while Lauer (TOP 2%) and Laws (2%) are conventional La- last names...

La-, var. Lavonte, Lavon, Lavell, Lavaughn, Lavante, Lavar, Laval, Latrell, Lashawn, Laroyce, Lasean, Laroy, Laron, Larenzo, Laray, Larell, Lamont, Lamario, Lamarcus, Lajon, Lamar, Ladell, Ladale
Root fr. American. .. Pronunciation emphasis is on the second .. Adoption of Laval and forms was more pronounced 45 years ago and has become diminished.

[...]

Lafayette
Derived fr. French. .. Historical. A moderately offbeat boys' name, Lafayette is found more frequently as a surname.

[...]

Lamar2, var. Lamarre, Lamarr
Based on Old French, Old German elements. "The water; land famous." Lamar was among 2015's Top names.

[....]

Lambert and variants
Lambert, var. Landbert, Lambirt, Lamberto, Lambart
Stems fr. Scandinavian. "Land brilliant." Usage of Landbert and forms was expansive during 1910-1919.

Lamont and variants
Lamont2, var. Lamonte, Lamond, Lammond
Root fr. Old Norse. "Law man." Lammond and Lamond are more rarefied as boys' names among the forms of Lamont.

Lamont and variants
Lamont2, var. Lamonte, Lamond, Lammond

Root fr. Old Norse. "Law man." Lammond and Lamond are more rarefied as boys' names among the forms of Lamont.

[...]

Lamar2, var. Lamarre, Lamarr
Based on Old French, Old German elements. "The water; land famous." Lamar was among 2015's Top names.

Lambert and variants
Lambert, var. Landbert, Lambirt, Lamberto, Lambart
Stems fr. Scandinavian. "Land brilliant." Usage of Landbert and forms was expansive during 1910-1919."

****
From http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Larron
What does Larron mean?

"Larron

Pronunciation of Larron [lar-ron] as a boys' name. Modern name: possibly blend of Darron with L-, or a variant of Lawrence.

VARIANTS Laren, Larin, Laron, Larran, Larren, Larrin

RELATIONS VIA DARRON, LAWRENCE Daran, Daren, Darin, Daron, Darran, Darrin, Darryn, Daryn, Derren, Derrin, Derron, Laranz, Larenz, Larrance, Larrence, Larrens, Larrey, Larry, Lars, Lauren, Laurens, Laurent, Laurenz, Laurie, Lavrans, Lavrens, Lawrey, Lawrie, Lawry, Lon, Loren, Lorin, Lorrenz, Lorry"

****
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Visitor comments are welcome.